Review: Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Green

…you have to be the bravest person in the world to go out everyday being yourself when no one likes who you are.

This one sentence made me cry the hardest while reading the most beautiful book I have read in a long while. It rings true with so many of us, yet so few are able to go out and actually do it.

Max is an 8 year old with some very serious problems. He hates people touching him, he hates bonus poops and when people don’t mean what they say. The things he loves are Star Wars themed LEGO, Mrs. Gosk, his teacher and Budo, his imaginary friend. When Max gets into big BIG trouble, Budo must do everything he can to save his best and dearest friend.

Budo has a dilemma: he is having somewhat of an existential crises. He is the oldest imaginary friend he knows, and he is not sure how much longer he will exist.

In this gorgeously descriptive story, Matthew Green explores the complex thing of being human, told from the point of view of a boy that was imagined into existence. The wonderful thing about this book is that Budo experiences very much the same anguish that human beings experience when they wonder why they are here and what their purpose is.

The characters in the story are well developed; each character has a story to tell but intertwines so fluidly with the others in the story, weaving a tale that is tinged with perpetual sadness. The story comes with hilarious moments, sad, sad moments and so much heart-wrenching emotion that it is more like you FEEL the story as opposed to just reading it. I fell in love with Max and his little quirks; and I love how the author describes his condition so succinctly without ever mentioning what it is.

This is a story close to my heart, as I am involved in genetic research for Autism; and this story gave me so much motivation to complete my Master’s research, as I was feeling a bit BLEGH about it.

This book will make you experience a myriad of emotions just from the descriptions of two boys who just want to be left alone to be who they are

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